Tuesday, December 6, 2011

For holiday gift-giving, think boating safety

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






December 6, 2011
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org


News Release



For holiday gift-giving, think boating safety



WASHINGTON – Puzzled about the perfect gift or stocking stuffers for the recreational boating family members and friends on your holiday gift-giving list? You can’t go wrong by thinking boating safety. The gift ideas are almost endless and many are relatively inexpensive.

For Dad, how about a rearming kit for his inflatable life jacket, or one of the new variety of 12-gauge flare guns with attached assortment of flares? Of course, if you can afford a more expensive gift, a marine-band VHF radio or a portable, hand-held EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) can be extremely useful while fishing or pleasure boating (be sure to register the EPIRB after purchase or rescuers may be delayed in responding).

Mom will be safe and stylish while sun bathing on the deck in a wrap-around-the-waist “belt pack lite” life jacket that won’t interfere with her sun-tan maintenance. A CO2- charged fanny pack model also is available…it’s unobtrusive yet readily accessible if the need arises.

For the kids, a new type-2 life jacket sized to your child’s weight and sporting a neoprene collar In most cases will keep them safely afloat if they happen to fall overboard.

Stocking stuffer ideas might include:

…a Coast Guard-approved fire extinguisher,

…a first aid kit in a watertight container,

…nautical charts for areas the family likes to visit,

…or a signaling kit, including mirror, whistle and air-horn.

If it’s been a while since your family coxswain has had a boating refresher course, your local Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla offers a number of inexpensive courses on such topics as:

About Boating Safety – a multi-session, in-depth boating safety course in which participants can earn a boating safety identification card.

Boating Skills and Seamanship – A far more comprehensive course for those who want to go beyond the About Boating Safety class, this course covers such topics as choosing the right boat and equipment for your needs; trailering, boat handling and understanding the “highway” signs and rules of the nautical road; navigation, lines and knots and understanding weather, and much more.

GPS for Mariners – a modern learning experience that focuses on the GPS equipment typically owned by recreational boaters and helps an individual learn how to use a GPS for practical recreational boating.

How to Read a Nautical Chart -- a course designed for use at sea to provide the navigator with the knowledge to interpret a chart’s contents, navigate to a destination and return safely to port.

Weekend Navigator – a comprehensive course designed for both experienced and novice powerboat and sailboat operators to help the boating enthusiast hone the skills required for a safe voyage on a variety of waters and under a variety of conditions.

Some of the most valuable gifts don’t cost anything but a few minutes of your time. For example, you can schedule a free vessel safety check with your local Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla at a marina near you. To find a flotilla in your area, simply log on to cgaux.org.

No matter what level of enthusiasm or how many years your family mariner has been boating, any of these items can help make boating a safer, more enjoyable experience. Consider giving the boating enthusiast in your family a life saving gift this holiday season.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, created by an Act of Congress in 1939, is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard across all mission areas. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary and a flotilla near you, visit cgaux.org





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Monday, November 21, 2011

Coast Guard Auxiliary national training meeting scheduled

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs







Date: November 21, 2011
Contact: Christopher Todd
Public Affairs Officer
Phone: (305) 490-6030
Email: ctodd@auxpa.org
http://cgaux.org



News Release



Coast Guard Auxiliary national training meeting scheduled



ST. LOUIS – The Coast Guard Auxiliary national training meeting (N-TRAIN) is scheduled for January 22-29, 2012 at the Sheraton Westport Lakeside Chalet Hotel. This year’s theme will continue the “Dependability, Integrity, Diversity” – watchwords of Auxiliary National Commodore James E. Vass, Jr.

N-TRAIN is held annually near the end of January in St. Louis. The event is hosted by the Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc., a non-profit organization focused on providing education, training and other program support to Auxiliary volunteers. N-TRAIN offers a variety of training opportunities for selected district staff officers and national leadership.

“Each year, we invite a select group of Auxiliary personnel to attend N-TRAIN for additional training,” said Ernie Davenport, National Meeting Administrator for the Coast Guard Auxiliary. “N-TRAIN provides an excellent forum for advanced training and discussion in targeted program areas.”

For additional information on N-TRAIN 2012, please visit: cgauxa.org/ntrain.html

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary created by an Act of Congress in 1939 is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard supporting the Coast Guard in nearly all its missions. Coast Guard Auxiliary men and women live and work in the communities they serve and understand the unique needs of their communities. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, please visit cgaux.org




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Thursday, November 17, 2011

Cooperative effort between U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Dominican Naval Auxiliary volunteers pays off in saved lives




U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






November 17, 2011
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org
http://cgaux.org/




News Release



Cooperative effort between U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary,
Dominican Naval Auxiliary volunteers pays off in saved lives




WASHINGTON – What began two years ago as an information exchange between members of the International Affairs unit of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and a group of civilian volunteers and senior naval officials of the Dominican Republic has blossomed into a dynamic organization already credited with saving more than 30 lives of boaters at sea, including five Americans.


The Dominican Republic Naval Auxiliary (Los Auxiliares Navales Dominicanos), officially established in December 2009 by decree of the President of the Dominican Republic, has grown to a unit of more than 200 members operating 135 boats and eight aircraft. They conduct search and rescue operations and recreational boating safety training in support of the Dominican Navy.


“Initially, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary international affairs team provided a lot of information to the Dominicans on how our organization works,” said John Cooper, the Auxiliary’s Director of International Affairs. “We followed that up with visits by U.S Coast Guard officers and Auxiliary subject matter experts to assist the Dominicans in development of their program.”


“Clearly, the Dominican Naval Auxiliary has done a superb job since its creation. They’ve set an impressive record by any standard…one of which they can be justifiably proud,” Cooper said.


This past August at the U.S Coast Guard Auxiliary’s national conference in Charlotte, N.C., Coast Guard Auxiliary Commodore James Vass and Dominican Naval Auxiliary Commodore Jose Antonio Najri signed a joint statement of intent recognizing the advantages to be obtained from continued bilateral cooperation in fostering on-water safety education for citizens of both nations.


The agreement calls for both organizations to continue working toward development of common training and operations standards, achieving international best practices and delivering fully-accredited computer-based training competencies to their respective members. It also calls for both organizations to be alert for opportunities to partner and share in the development and application of educational materials.


“The Dominican Republic and the U.S. traditionally have had very close cooperation,” said COMO Najri. “For our Auxiliary, the recently signed agreement is further proof of our two countries’ close ties that we must continually strengthen to not only save lives, but to protect our countries in these difficult times.”


The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, created by an Act of Congress in 1939, is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard across all mission areas. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary and a flotilla near you, visit cgaux.org

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Monday, November 7, 2011

Go LIVE with the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary!

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs









Date: November 7, 2011
Contact: Christopher Todd
Public Affairs Officer
Phone: (305) 490-6030
Email: ctodd@auxpa.org
http://cgaux.org





News Release



Go LIVE with the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary!



WASHINGTON – The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary National Government and Public Affairs Directorate today launched a new online communications vehicle designed to provide an in-depth and behind the scenes look into one of America’s leading volunteer organizations. Coast Guard Auxiliary Live (http://live.cgaux.org) will serve as the official blog for the Coast Guard Auxiliary and the sister site to the immensely popular Coast Guard Compass – the official blog of the U.S. Coast Guard.

This mission of Coast Guard Auxiliary Live is to provide timely and accurate news and information of national interest from throughout the Coast Guard Auxiliary’s various districts, divisions, and flotilla operating units. Auxiliary members may submit news, photo, and video content directly to the editorial staff via e-mail at live@auxpa.org

"Coast Guard Auxiliary Live promises to be a superb source for boating safety and maritime information as well as updates on the phenomenal volunteers of the Coast Guard Auxiliary," said Capt. Ron LaBrec, chief of the Coast Guard office of public affairs. "I am extremely proud to have Coast Guard Compass and Coast Guard Auxiliary Live bringing the public compelling stories of how our service provides the maritime safety, security and environmental sustainability that is so vital to the quality of life and prosperity of our nation."

Coast Guard Auxiliary Live is the most recent collaboration between the Coast Guard Headquarters Office of Public Affairs (CG-0922) and the Coast Guard Auxiliary National Government and Public Affairs Directorate. By having both Compass and Live operating off the same platform, both public affairs teams will be able to share ideas, develop new tactics, and cross promote content more effectively.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary created by an Act of Congress in 1939 is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard supporting the Coast Guard in nearly all its missions. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, please visit cgaux.org

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Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Gene Sibert elected president of Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc.

November 1, 2011
Contact: Tom Nunes
Tel: 602-617-1979
Email: DirectorDevelopment@cgauxa.org
http://cgauxa.org





News Release



Gene Seibert elected president of Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc.



TAMPA, FLA – The board of the Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, the non-profit organization providing financial and other support to the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and its volunteers, elected Gene Seibert of Virginia as its new president and chief operating officer. Seibert will oversee the day-to-day operations of the Association including fund raising, finance, product development, and other functions.
Seibert has previously served as the chairman and CEO of the Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc., as the national commodore of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, and as a member of the board of directors of the Coast Guard Foundation and the Association for Rescue at Sea (AFRAS), Boat US and the United Safe Boating Institute.
The Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc., is a Non-Profit, 501(c)(3) organization incorporated in the District of Columbia providing financial and other support to the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and its volunteers. The Association provides funds for the national Auxiliary programs, facilitates national training, produces educational and outreach materials for the recreational boating safety and other public outreach efforts. Donations are actively solicited and appreciated.




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Thursday, October 13, 2011

Equip Yourself: Gear for Cold Weather Boating

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






Date: October 13, 2011
Contact: Penny Bailey
Public Affairs
Phone:: 417-425-6155
penny.bailey@cgauxnet.us


News Release



Equip Yourself: Gear for Cold Weather Boating

Washington - Cold weather boaters need protection from hypothermia, both on deck and in the event of falling overboard. Cold water shortens in-water survival time, making a quick rescue essential. Fortunately, you have options whether you hunt, fish, or cruise on cold water. Choose the right gear to increase your chances of surviving a cold-weather mishap.

1. Flotation Coat
Flotation coats provide warmth and double as a life jacket should the wearer fall in the water. Float coats are recommended for boaters who boat year-round in locales with moderate air temperatures and cold water. If you boat in extremely cold temperatures, a flotation coat will not protect you from hypothermia if you fall into the water.

2. Immersion or Survival Suit
Winter boating calls for hardy gear. Survival suits protect you from the elements, and provide flotation and hypothermia protection if you enter the water. Wearing a survival suit can increase survival time in cold water.

3. Dry Suit
Dry suits can be instantly drawn tight to prevent water from entering, Appropriate thermal layers worn beneath the dry suit provide insulation and they are not buoyant. Dry suits are suitable for intentional entry into the water, but provide no passive protection if you fall in.

5. Personal Position Locator Beacon
Otherwise known as a PLB, a personal position locator beacon is a scaled down version of the Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB). When immersed in water or manually activated both EPIRBs and PLBs transmit a signal that allows rescuers to pinpoint your location.

6. Personal Emergency Locator Light
An emergency light worn and activated if a person is in the water can attract the attention of rescuers, providing a much more visible target than your head in the water. The bright, flashing light increases the chances of being spotted by rescuers or a passing boater.

7. Flares
Store hand held and/or parachute flares in immersion suit pockets, secured with a lanyard. Study their instructions before you need them.

8. Whistle
Attracting attention will increase your chances of surviving in the water. Whistles are a cheap and simple way to make noise without exhausting yourself. Rescuers are trained to turn off the boat engines and listen for a period of time while they are on search and rescue missions, or a nearby boater may hear the signal. Conventional whistles don’t work if the “pea” inside is wet, so choose a waterproof model.

Common sense can also increase your chances of survival in cold weather. Dress in layers to provide maximum protection and warmth. Technical fibers provide thermal protection and won’t absorb water. Include a hat to protect your head from heat loss. Wear gloves.

Don't be tempted to skip proper cold weather clothing and gear. Be sure to wear a life jacket and hypothermia protection when boating in the cold.

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America's Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service's missions. For more information about the Coast Guard Auxiliary visit http://www.cgaux.org

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Thursday, September 29, 2011

Don't trash our sea

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






Date: September 29, 2011
Contact: Anthony Turner
aturner@auxpa.org
http://auxpa.org




News Release




Don't trash our sea



WASHINGTON-The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary reminds everyone that marine debris are everyone's concern and everyone's problem. Debris generally originates, from two distinct sources, the sea (and inland waterways) and land. Ocean/inland waterways-based sources include boats and ships including the smallest sailboat to the largest container ship, along with offshore rigs and drilling platforms. Land-based sources include, sewer overflows and storm drains, landfills, manufacturing and sewage treatment plants and beachgoers. About 80% of debris originates onshore with 20% coming from offshore sources. Some marine debris persist in marine environments for a very long time – Mylar balloons (centuries), derelict fishing gear (centuries), plastic bags (centuries), cigarette butts (2 – 10 years), monofilament line (600 years), plastic bottles (450 years), 6-pack holder (400 years), aluminum cans (200 – 500 years), and Styrofoam buoy (80 years)

Balloons exposed to seawater deteriorated much slower than if exposed to air. Even after 12 months in salt water they retained their elasticity. What goes up must come down! Balloons lighting on land or sea can be mistaken for prey and eaten by animals. Balloons in an aquatic environment can look a great deal like jellyfish—a major source of food for many animals. Sea turtles, dolphins, whales, fish, and seabirds have been reported with balloons in their stomachs.
Mylar balloons reflective light and can, be mistaken for a distress signal. Rescuers can waste valuable resources investigating what from several miles away can appear to be a distress signal. In some jurisdictions, the mass release of balloons is illegal

WHAT YOU CAN DO TO REDUCE MARINE DEBRIS
• Never intentionally discard any item into the marine environment

• Tie it down, secure it, stow it

• Secure all plastic wrap and packaging

• Reduce, reuse, and recycle

• Properly dispose of trash and fishing gear

• Participate in coastal cleanup programs

• Buy recycled products with little or no packaging

• Keep cigarette butts off streets and beaches

• Cut the rings in plastic six pack holders

• Set a good example and educate others about marine debris.
Under federal law, it is illegal for any vessel to discharge plastics or garbage containing plastics into any waters. Additional restrictions on dumping non-plastic waste are outlined below. Regional, state or local laws may place further restrictions on the disposal of garbage. ALL discharge of garbage is prohibited in the Great Lakes or their connecting or tributary waters. Each violation of these requirements may result in a fine of up to $500,000 and 6 years imprisonment.

In lakes, rivers, bays, sounds and up to 3 miles offshore it is illegal to dump:

All garbage

From 3 to 12 nautical miles offshore it is illegal to dump:

• Plastic
• Dunnage, lining and packing materials that floats
• All other trash if not ground to less that 1"

From 12 to 25 nautical miles offshore it is illegal to dump:

• Plastic
• Dunnage, lining and packing materials that float

Outside 25 nautical miles offshore it is illegal to dump:

• Plastic

"MARPOL PLACARD" Vessels 26' or longer must display the above information in a prominent place for passengers and crew to read

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America's Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service's missions. For more information about the Coast Guard Auxiliary visit http://www.cgaux.org




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Thursday, September 15, 2011

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs







Date: September 15, 2011
Contact: Penny Bailey
Public Affairs
Phone:: 417-425-6155
penny.bailey@cgauxnet.us



News Release



Boating safety tips for hunters


Washington - Capsizing and falling overboard into cold water are major hazards for hunters. During hunting seasons, most waters are cold enough to pose a serious hypothermia threat. Nationwide, 70 percent of all boating fatalities are the result of drowning. Almost 90 percent of the victims were not wearing life jackets. Responsible hunters need to be aware of the dangers and follow a few simple rules to make hunting on the water safer and more enjoyable:
• Leave a float plan with someone at home, describing where you are going, who you are with and when you expect to return.
• Transport firearms to the boat unloaded, cased, muzzle first, with the action open.
• Always wear an approved and properly fitted life jacket when in a boat.
• Carry a throwable flotation device in case someone falls overboard.
• Stow visual distress signals on board.
• Know the weather forecast for the area. High winds can be dangerous. Cancel trip if water conditions aren’t safe. Keep an AM radio handy for the latest updates. Better yet, buy a VHF-FM marine radio with NOAA weather channels.
• Never overload your boat. Load gear low in the boat and distribute the weight evenly.
• Always stay seated when shooting from an open boat.
• Never anchor from the stern.
• If an accident occurs, STAY WITH THE BOAT and use distress signals.
• Unless clothing is creating a hazard, do not remove extra clothing. It can help prevent hypothermia.
• To retain body heat, pull your knees to your chest and keep your elbows to your sides.
• When overboard without a lifejacket:
o Trap air in chest waders by bending your knees and raising your feet then lying back in the water can help you stay afloat.
o An oar under the knees and another behind the back and shoulders can be used to keep you floating.
o Trap air in hip boots by bending your knees and lying on your back can help you remain afloat.
o Decoys stuffed inside your jacket will provide additional buoyancy.
While all accidents cannot be prevented, following these few simple rules, your survival chances are greatly improved.
The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America's Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service's missions. For more information about the Coast Guard Auxiliary visit http://www.cgaux.org




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Saturday, August 27, 2011









U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs









August 27, 2011
Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org
http/cgaux.org



News Release


U.S. Power Squadrons, Coast Guard Auxiliary to boost boating safety efforts



CHARLOTTE,N.C.– The U.S. Power Squadrons (USPS) and the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will increase their coordinated safety efforts among America’s recreational boating community under a new agreement that broadens cooperative efforts in vessel examinations, public affairs and education. The agreement was signed today at the Auxiliary’s national conference – NACON 2011 – in Charlotte.

Recreational boating is one of the most popular outdoors activities in the United States. In 2010 there were nearly 12.5 million registered boats, with many millions more that are not required to be registered by states or the U.S. Coast Guard. That same year, the Coast Guard recorded more than 4,600 accidents involving 672 deaths, 3,153 injuries and approximately $35.5 million in property damage. The majority of these accidents happened on boats operated by individuals who had received no boating education.

The U.S. Power Squadrons and the Coast Guard Auxiliary are committed to changing this reality through increased boater education, vessel examinations and public boater safety awareness events.

“With this cooperative effort we will reach out to the growing population of recreational boaters providing needed training and vessel exams to keep them safe on the water,” said Jim Vass, Auxiliary National Commodore.

"The USPS is proud to continue our partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary as we continually strive to improve the boating experience for recreational boaters,” noted Frank Dvorak, USPS Chief Commander.
The United States Power Squadrons is the nation’s largest nonprofit recreational boating organization with a presence in all 50 states plus the territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands as well as Japan. There are more than 40,000 members in 400 squadrons and 33 districts worldwide. For more information about the U.S. Power Squadrons visit http://www.usps.org

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America's Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service's missions. For more information about the Coast Guard Auxiliary visit
http://www.cgaux.org/





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Monday, August 15, 2011

Coast Guard Auxiliary to hold national conference in Charlotte



U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






August 15, 2011
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org
http/cgaux.org


News Release


Coast Guard Auxiliary to hold national conference in Charlotte


CHARLOTTE, N.C. –As many as 500 members of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary as well as members of other country’s Coast Guard auxiliaries from as far away as Australia -- are expected to converge on Charlotte next week when the organization hosts its national conference – NACON 2011 The convention, an annual event for more than 35 years, runs from August 24-28 at the Westin Charlotte, 601 South College Street.

“Each year, we try to hold our conference in a new, exciting venue and Charlotte offers a beautiful hotel in a downtown setting, with so many unique attractions and excellent airline service,” said Ernie Davenport, the Auxiliary’s 2011 conference organizer. “The brand new NASCAR Hall of Fame is only three blocks from the conference hotel and the U.S. National Whitewater Center is just a short drive away,” Davenport noted, citing just two of the interesting venues that make Charlotte an attractive convention destination for the Auxiliary.

In spite of a weak U.S. economy and high unemployment, volunteerism remains strong in America – and the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary’s over 30,000 members continue to volunteer millions of hours of their time in support of the Coast Guard and recreational boating safety. Auxiliary members are well on the way to providing nearly three million hours of volunteer support to the Coast Guard in 2011.

In addition to holding business meetings, the conference will feature workshops and training sessions, including paddlesport safety, aquatic nuisance species, navigation systems, vessel safety examination processes and boat operations training. A special guest speaker at the Commodore’s Banquet August 27 will be Vice Admiral Sally Brice-O’Hara, Vice Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, created by an Act of Congress in 1939, is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard across all mission areas. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary and a flotilla near you, visit cgaux.org.


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Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Score a "Touchdown"- When Choosing a Life Jacket

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






August 2, 2011
Contact: Anthony Turner
Phone 310-488-0723
aturner@auxpa.org
http://auxpa.org



News Release



Score a “Touchdown” – When Choosing a Life Jacket


WASHINGTON-There’s no doubt that life jackets save lives. An average of nine people a day in the United States die as a result of drowning - deaths that could have been prevented. But a life jacket that does not fit properly can put a person at risk of drowning. Proper fit is imperative for safety on the water.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary has a few tips to follow when choosing a life jacket.

· Choose only a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) approved life jacket, and the correct size for the weight of the person. The USCG stamp of approval, size, whether it is for a child or an adult, and appropriate weight of the wearer should be listed inside the jacket. A person’s chest size and stomach size may come into play when selecting the right life jacket.

· Use the “touchdown” test to see if your life jacket fits properly; Lift your arms above your head as if calling a touchdown. The chest portion of the jacket should not touch your chin when you look left, right or over your shoulder. If the jacket passes this test, it most likely fits. If possible try it out in shallow water. The life jacket should not ride up on your body. However, ride-up may happen if your stomach is larger than your chest.

· Weigh a child and measure for chest size under the arms before shopping for a child’s life jacket. A properly fitting jacket should be snug but not tight.

· Check for proper fit of a life jacket on a child. Wearing the jacket, the child should stand normally with arms at his or her sides. Grab the jacket at the shoulders and firmly lift up. The jacket does not fit if it moves more than three inches up and down the child’s body during the test.

· Ensure a life jacket for an infant or child has a crotch strap to help keep the life jacket on, an oversized float collar to help keep the head out of the water and a grab loop for easier water rescue. All straps should be intact and fastened at all times.

What is the safest life jacket? In terms of risk of drowning, the safest life jacket is the one you’re willing to wear! There are many good choices to keep safe on the water. Some of the choices are a better for certain situations than others, and therefore the choices are explained in the "Think Safe" life jacket pamphlet that is sold with every US Coast Guard approved life jacket. By reading the pamphlet, you can understand how to safely have fun on the water.

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.

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Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Electricity and water don't mix






U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs





Date: July 26, 2011
Contact: Phil Bailey
Phone:417-271-9116
pwbailey@centurytel.net


News Release


Electricity and water don’t mix


WASHINGTON- The Coast Guard Auxiliary suggests you have your dock inspected periodically for bad wires and loose grounds. The same goes for your boat. Any time a person swims around a dock or boat where there is AC power, electrical shock could occur. A boat plugged into shore power with a short on board is dangerous and the owner may not be aware of it. AC current may enter the bonding system if an AC ground becomes disconnected then electrical current can enter the water by way of a bonded thru hull fitting. The boat dock can also develop a short and create a potential life threatening hazard. Some drowning were discovered to be from electrical shock.

Electrical discharge into salt water from a boat is not as dangerous as discharge into fresh water. The reason being, salt water is a better conductor and will allow the current to flow to the bottom or some other grounded metal around the dock or to the neighbors boat while fresh water being less conductive will form an electrified field around the boat. Many marinas have stopped allowing swimming around docks because of these hazards.

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.



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Sunday, July 17, 2011

Flotillas from NOCAL, Nevada and Utah conduct exercise to prep for America's cup

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs









Date: July 17, 2011
Contact: Perry Joiner
Phone:510-551-3357
Email: pejoiner@gmail.com
http://auxpa.org




News Release




Flotillas from NOCAL, Nevada and Utah conduct exercise to prep for America's Cup




ALAMEDA, Calif.— Members of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, a civilian volunteer component of the U. S. Coast Guard, took to the water Saturday, July 16 in the first ever district-wide Operational Exercise (OPEX) to hone their skills and prepare for the increasing challenges that face the San Francisco Bay area with the arrival of the America’s Cup yacht race in 2013. Flotillas from Northern California, Nevada and Utah converged on Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif., in a series of exercises designed to improve their capabilities of the operational facilities and crews lined up to participate.

The event, organized by Auxiliarist Dean LaChapelle, District Captain for response and operations, included around 80 people and six operational vessels that will conduct maneuvering exercises, search and rescue patterns and man overboard drills. At the same time, shoreside training will focus on related skills, such as navigation and communications. Two mobile communications trailers coordinated concurrent communications activities between Bodega Bay, Folsom Lake, Lake Tahoe and Lake Jordanelle, Utah.

"In contrast to the Operational Training Exercise (OPTREX) we usually have to train and evaluate our operational units," said LaChapelle. "These are actual operational exercises we are using to improve the skills of our qualified crews."

Operational training exercises for Auxiliarists are typically conducted on a local level by the flotillas or divisions. This event is uniquely the first district-wide event involving several states in the area of responsibility.

Participants had a challenging and exciting time given the size and scope of missions involved in the exercise. More importantly this training helped towards additional qualifications in boat handling, navigation rules, search patterns, etc., for participants.

Editors note: The Coast Guard Auxiliary is divided into four levels of administration and supervisory responsibility. These four levels are: FLOTILLA, DIVISION, DISTRICT, and NATIONAL.

To be part of this exciting organization go to http://cgaux.org and click on units to find a flotilla near you.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard in nearly all it’s service missions. The Auxiliary was created by Congress in 1939. For more information, please visit www.cgaux.org






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Monday, July 11, 2011

Coast Guard Auxiliary National Conference scheduled for Charlotte




U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs








Date: July 11, 2011
Contact: Christopher Todd
Public Affairs Officer
Phone Number: (305) 490-6030
Email: ctodd@auxpa.org
http://cgaux.org/

News Release




Coast Guard Auxiliary National Conference
scheduled for Charlotte



WASHINGTON – The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will hold its 2011
National Conference (NACON) August 24-28 at the Westin Charlotte
Hotel in Charlotte, N.C. Coast Guard Auxiliary members from
throughout the nation will converge for a series of meetings and
social functions.

“We invite all Coast Guard Auxiliary members to attend NACON,” said
Ernie Davenport, Conference Administrator, for the organization.
“NACON is a great opportunity for Auxiliary members to meet and
interact with senior leaders and members from throughout the
organization.”

NACON is sponsored by the Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc. (CGAuxA),
a non-profit organization based in St. Louis that provides business
management and training support for the Coast Guard Auxiliary.
CGAuxA welcomes corporate sponsors and other interested parties to
participate in NACON.

For additional information on NACON 2011, please visit: cgauxa.org/nacon

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary created by an Act of Congress in 1939
is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard
supporting the Coast Guard in nearly all its missions. For more
information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, please visit cgaux.org

EDITOR’S NOTE: NACON 2011 Logo available in .PDF or .JPG formats




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Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Propeller Strikes May Prove Deadly

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs







July 5, 2011
Contact: Miles Brusherd
417-337-0201
mbrusherd@auxpa.org
http://auxpa.org


News Release

Propeller Strikes May Prove Deadly
WASHINGTON – Each year boat propellers are a leading cause of boating accidents. In many cases, the victims were in the water and near the stern of the vessel.
Passengers moving around a boat or improperly seated may fall overboard when the vessel is moving too fast for prevailing conditions. People can be ejected from a boat for a variety of reasons including, a collision with another boat, hitting a submerged object, rogue waves, and sudden acceleration/deceleration in speed
Contributing factors to propeller strikes accidents are operator inexperience, incompetence, negligence, and operating under the influence of alcohol or other substances. Bow and transom riding are also inherently dangerous.
The Coast Guard Auxiliary suggests turning the engine off and keeping the boat tied to the dock while passengers are boarding or disembarking. The vessel operator should alert passengers prior to speed change or when large waves are imminent. While a boat is underway everyone should be seated and wearing a Coast Guard approved life jacket.
Steps to take for a Man Overboard situation
1. A person seeing someone fall overboard should shout "Man Overboard Port or Starboard side (left or right will do)"
2. Throw a life ring, life jacket or other floatable device to the person.
3. Turn the boat toward the side the person fell overboard.
4. Circle around keeping the individual in sight.
5. Slow down. Turn the engine off at least a boat length away to avoid propeller strike
6. Bring the person aboard and render first aid as needed, checking for additional injuries.
The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.


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Thursday, June 23, 2011

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs










June 23, 2011

Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org
http/cgaux.org




News Release



Alcohol and Water DON’T Mix..When Boating Safety is Involved



WASHINGTON – Statistics compiled by the U.S. Coast Guard show the use of alcohol while boating was the leading contributor to on-the-water accidents…and the needless loss of 126 lives during 2010.
With the long Fourth of July weekend just ahead of us, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary encourages all boaters to “Boat Responsibly” and be sure you have a designated sober and qualified coxswain on board to ensure your boat gets back to the dock safely. In all, 605 deaths from boating accidents were recorded last year, with July being one of the most hazardous months for boaters.
During 2010, alcohol use was involved in 330 boating accidents and, in addition to contributing to the deaths of 126 boaters, resulted in injuries to 293 others.
Just as in driving a car, alcohol use while boating can lead to impairment of critical senses needed to avoid boating accidents. Slowed reaction time and diminished decision making ability can make your day on the water a less than enjoyable one. Additionally, alcohol can cause dehydration and illness when you are exposed to a hot, sunny day of boating.
“Boat Responsibly” … and don’t mix alcohol with your day on the water. Save the “bourbon and branch” until you return home.
The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.



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Wednesday, June 15, 2011

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs















June 15, 2011
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org
http/cgaux.org



News Release




Vessel Safety Check – The Only Cost is a Little of Your Time



WASHINGTON – With Memorial Day now behind us, the summer boating season is “officially” under way. If you haven’t already taken the time to have a U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary vessel safety examiner check out your boat, now is the time to do so.

Auxiliary flotillas around the country sponsor vessel safety examinations almost on a weekly or monthly basis at most local marinas and other outdoor marine events and venues. The safety check is free…your only investment is a little time.

A typical vessel safety check takes only about 30 minutes…and often can be done while you are waiting in line at the launch ramp. Or if you already are tied up at dockside, the safety check can be performed while you are making your last minute preparations and briefing your passengers on safety aspects of your boat.

Requirements for earning a Vessel Safety Check Decal to display on you boat include:

 proper display of registration numbers and appropriate registration documentation,;
 availability of personal flotation devices, visual distress signals, sound- producing devices and fire extinguishers;
 proper ventilation and backfire flame control for your engine;
 operable navigation lights and marine sanitation devices, if appropriate;
 pollution placards, copies of navigation rules and compliance with appropriate state local requirements,
 and overall condition of your vessel’s electrical and fuel systems, galley cooking systems and hazard-free deck and clean bilge.

While not a requirement to obtain a vessel safety check decal, the Coast Guard Auxiliary examiners recommend you have a marine radio, dewatering device, anchor and line suitable for the depths of water in which you will be operating, a first aid kit and other items that your examiner will review with you during the inspection.

So don’t put off a vessel safety check any longer…BOAT SMART FROM THE START!!!

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.

Photos are available upon request.





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Sunday, June 5, 2011

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs








Date: May 30, 2011
Contact: Phil Bailey
Phone:417-271-9116
pwbailey@centurytel.net




News Release


What is an Epirb?



WASHINGTON- EPIRB stands for emergency position-indicating radio beacon. This device is designed to transmit a distress signal around the world if you needed. There are two types of EPIRBs. A manual and an automatic/manual. U.S. commercial fishing vessels, uninspected passenger vessels that carry six or more people and uninspected commercial vessels are the only vessels legally required to carry an EPIRB. But, like a life jacket, an EPIRB might be instrumental in saving your life.

“The most important thing for effective operation of beacons is for the beacon to be properly registered,” said Lt. Cmdr. Mark Turner, the Coast Guard’s Search and Rescue Satellite (SARSAT) liaison officer. “Registering your beacon means the Coast Guard can be in contact with the folks back home who can provide search and rescue responders with more information to assist in a search.”

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.


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Thursday, May 12, 2011

 Date: May 18, 2010
Contact: Kirk Scarborough
Public Affairs Dept.
Press Release
Coast Guard Auxiliary Establishes New Float Plan
          
 11 May 2010: The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary announced today its new 2010 Float Plan that offers unprecedented flexibility and ease of use. 

The new float plan allows users of Adobe Reader version 8 or later to save any data they enter into the float plan on their computer for later revision or use.  Users now only need to enter information about their vessel one time.  Data related to specific trips can be added or changed as necessary.  “The ability to save data and e-mail a completed float plan to a friend or relative is a huge convenience for the recreational boater” says Public Affairs Web Branch Chief Vern Jansky.  “It was the most requested feature, and we’re very pleased to be able to offer it in this update.”

The update also includes new data fields, additional user defined fields, and new drop-down lists that show all of the available choices for greater ease of use.  The Vessel Type field has been expanded offering a broader range of recreational vessels to choose from.  The Itinerary section has been enhanced to improve readability.  Also, each field on the plan has an explanatory “tip” that is displayed when the user hovers over the field, providing specific guidance on the type of data that should be entered.

In accordance with the 2010 DHS Appropriations Act, the U.S. Coast Guard terminated the transmission of all U.S. LORAN-C signals on 08 Feb 2010.  Additionally, the International Cospas-Sarsat System ceased satellite processing of 121.5/243 MHz beacons on 1 February 2009.  Although Emergency Locator Transmitters used by aircraft may still be used, alerts from these devices or from 121.5/243 MHz EPIRBs will no longer be acted upon unless detected by an over flying aircraft.  The 2010 Float Plan update reflects these changes with the elimination of LORAN C and EPIRB Class A, B, C, S, and Inmarsat E options.

Availability

The updated Float Plan will be available 21 May 2010 worldwide on the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary’s Float Plan Central website: www.floatplancentral.org.

Man gets 18 months for Hoax distress call to Coast Guard

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Public Affairs
                                                                                                                                                  Date:November 8, 2010
Contact: Anthony Turner
Phone: 310-488-0723
mailto:anthony.turner@yahoo.com                                                                                                                                                                        http://auxpa.org


News Release


Man gets 18 months for Hoax distress call to Coast Guard

WASHINGTON - Most people in America are familiar with 911 and know that a call to 911 is how to summons help in an emergency. Most people also know that making a false 911 call is illegal. Penalties for making a false 911 call have been increased, for example early this year the State of Illinois passed a law that goes into effect on January 1, 2011 imposing greater penalties on individuals found guilty of making a false 911 call.

What most people might not realize is that a false distress call to the U.S. Coast Guard is also a crime. In the boating world a distress call on marine VHF radio channel 16 is the same a placing a 911 call via cell or landline phone.

Recently a Detroit resident was convicted and sentenced in federal court for making a false distress call to the U.S. Coast Guard, according to United States Attorney Barbara McQuade and Captain Stephen Torpey, Chief of Incident Management for the Ninth Coast Guard District.

Andre D. Cheatom, 19 years old, was sentenced to 18 months incarceration, supervised release for three years, a special assessment of $100.00, and ordered to pay $14,302 in restitution for knowingly and willfully causing the Coast Guard to attempt to save lives and property when no help was needed, in violation of Title 14, U.S. Code, section 88(c).

“When members of the Coast Guard respond to a hoax call, they are diverted from people in actual distress,” McQuade said. “We take a hard line on these cases because we want to deter people from making hoax calls.”

“I am concerned that there are people willing to risk the lives of other boaters who might be in legitimate need of rescue or assistance, as well as needlessly endangering response crews, by knowingly making a false distress call,” said Captain Stephen Torpey, Chief of Incident Management for the Ninth Coast Guard District. “This conviction demonstrates the lengths we will go to ensure those who make hoax calls are prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.”

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary reminds boaters to use their marine radios responsibly.

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America’s Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.
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Make a New Year's Resolution That Really Counts

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs
                                                                                      
January 15, 2011
Contact:  Kirk Scarborough
                                                                            Public Affairs Dept.
                                                                               714 777-2300
                                                                                              Captkirk55@aol.com
Press Release

Make a New Year's Resolution That Really Counts

Check Out the Coast Guard Auxiliary
Kicking off 2011 Welcoming Volunteers

WASHINGTON- If your New Year’s resolution includes finding a meaningful volunteer position, learning new skills and making new friends, you may find a perfect fit with the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary the uniformed civilian volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard, is actively looking for volunteers interested in serving their country and their community.

There are many places in the Coast Guard Auxiliary where you can make a difference and find a sense of belonging.  The Auxiliary works on the water, in the air and on land.  It conducts safety patrols and search and rescue missions, assists the Coast Guard with homeland security duties, teaches boating safety classes, conducts free boat safety checks and many other activities. People  who have talents in web design, information technology, public affairs and other administrative roles are also needed.

Training opportunities include marine safety and environmental protection, recreational boating safety, outreach, boat crew and coxswain.   Applicants must be a U.S. Citizen, at least 17 years old, and pass a background check.

Interested?   Go to   http://www.join.cgaux.org/

Winterization Mistakes Could Cost You Your Boat.

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs
                                                                                                               Date: October 16, 2010
                                                                                                                                                          
Phil Bailey  
                              Phone:417-271-9116
                                                                                       pwbailey@centurytel.net


News Release




Winterization Mistakes Could Cost You Your Boat.

WASHINGTON – Often, boat owners who visit their boats in early spring find their boats nearly under water.. They might or might not get a call from the marina to get down there right away to take care of their boat. Don’t let this happen to you. Don’t make these mistakes which might cost you big bucks or your boat.  
  • Using your Biminis or dodger as a boat cover for winter. Biminis and dodgers are for  sun and spray not for winterization.  Winter is very hard on Biminis and  dodgers causing premature replacement  and possibly letting water or snow into  your boat or cockpit.  
  • Storing  a boat in the water without a cover might  result in it being  underwater. Cockpits have drains that might   clog up with debris causing the cockpit to fill with water, sinking the  boat.  Heavy snow could push a boat with low freeboard underwater.  
  • Not closing  sea cocks stored in the water. Too  many  things can happen to that seacock or the  attached hose  causing the boat to take on  water.
  • Storing a boat  and not winterizing, even in  warmer clime.  Storing ashore can freeze an engine block with an  unexpected cold spell.  Storing in the water may keep the engine block a  little warmer.
  • Petcocks in  the engine block may be clogged when  you tried to drain the engine for winter.  You might not realize that no  water came out of the clogged petcocks. Be sure to visually check if water  drains from each  petcock.  If you do have a clogged  petcock  a  coat hanger works great clearing it.
  • Having the  marina attendant look after your boat  might  be a good idea. No matter whom you pay to  watch your boat it  is always best to check on your boat periodically during  the off season.  Nobody cares more for your boat than you.
            
The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, America’s Volunteer Guardians, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.
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Refresh Boating Skills During Winter Season

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs

November 15, 2010
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
http/cgaux.org
News Release

Refresh Boating Skills During Winter Season

WASHINGTON Your boat may be out of the water and properly winterized, but you don’t have to wait until spring to begin planning for the next season of enjoyment on the water.  Why not take advantage of the winter lull to refresh your boating skills…or learn new ones…in courses conducted by the local flotilla of the U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary?

Coast Guard Auxiliary flotillas throughout the country conduct a variety of courses to help keep you knowledgeable and safe while operating your boat on the nation’s lakes and rivers… and offshore as well.  Typical courses:

About Boating Safety – an eight hour, in-depth boating safety course necessary to obtain a boat license of safety certification in many states.

GPS for Mariners – a modern learning experience that focuses on the GPS equipment typically owned by recreational boaters and helps an individual learn how to use a GPS for practical recreational boating.

How to Read a Nautical Chart -- a course designed for use at sea to provide the navigator with the knowledge to interpret a chart’s contents, navigate to a destination and return safely to port.

Weekend Navigator – a comprehensive course designed for both experienced and novice powerboat and sailboat operators to help the boating enthusiast learn of hone the skills required for a safe voyage on a variety of waters and under a variety of conditions.