Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Electricity and water don't mix






U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs





Date: July 26, 2011
Contact: Phil Bailey
Phone:417-271-9116
pwbailey@centurytel.net


News Release


Electricity and water don’t mix


WASHINGTON- The Coast Guard Auxiliary suggests you have your dock inspected periodically for bad wires and loose grounds. The same goes for your boat. Any time a person swims around a dock or boat where there is AC power, electrical shock could occur. A boat plugged into shore power with a short on board is dangerous and the owner may not be aware of it. AC current may enter the bonding system if an AC ground becomes disconnected then electrical current can enter the water by way of a bonded thru hull fitting. The boat dock can also develop a short and create a potential life threatening hazard. Some drowning were discovered to be from electrical shock.

Electrical discharge into salt water from a boat is not as dangerous as discharge into fresh water. The reason being, salt water is a better conductor and will allow the current to flow to the bottom or some other grounded metal around the dock or to the neighbors boat while fresh water being less conductive will form an electrified field around the boat. Many marinas have stopped allowing swimming around docks because of these hazards.

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.



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Sunday, July 17, 2011

Flotillas from NOCAL, Nevada and Utah conduct exercise to prep for America's cup

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs









Date: July 17, 2011
Contact: Perry Joiner
Phone:510-551-3357
Email: pejoiner@gmail.com
http://auxpa.org




News Release




Flotillas from NOCAL, Nevada and Utah conduct exercise to prep for America's Cup




ALAMEDA, Calif.— Members of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, a civilian volunteer component of the U. S. Coast Guard, took to the water Saturday, July 16 in the first ever district-wide Operational Exercise (OPEX) to hone their skills and prepare for the increasing challenges that face the San Francisco Bay area with the arrival of the America’s Cup yacht race in 2013. Flotillas from Northern California, Nevada and Utah converged on Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif., in a series of exercises designed to improve their capabilities of the operational facilities and crews lined up to participate.

The event, organized by Auxiliarist Dean LaChapelle, District Captain for response and operations, included around 80 people and six operational vessels that will conduct maneuvering exercises, search and rescue patterns and man overboard drills. At the same time, shoreside training will focus on related skills, such as navigation and communications. Two mobile communications trailers coordinated concurrent communications activities between Bodega Bay, Folsom Lake, Lake Tahoe and Lake Jordanelle, Utah.

"In contrast to the Operational Training Exercise (OPTREX) we usually have to train and evaluate our operational units," said LaChapelle. "These are actual operational exercises we are using to improve the skills of our qualified crews."

Operational training exercises for Auxiliarists are typically conducted on a local level by the flotillas or divisions. This event is uniquely the first district-wide event involving several states in the area of responsibility.

Participants had a challenging and exciting time given the size and scope of missions involved in the exercise. More importantly this training helped towards additional qualifications in boat handling, navigation rules, search patterns, etc., for participants.

Editors note: The Coast Guard Auxiliary is divided into four levels of administration and supervisory responsibility. These four levels are: FLOTILLA, DIVISION, DISTRICT, and NATIONAL.

To be part of this exciting organization go to http://cgaux.org and click on units to find a flotilla near you.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard in nearly all it’s service missions. The Auxiliary was created by Congress in 1939. For more information, please visit www.cgaux.org






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Monday, July 11, 2011

Coast Guard Auxiliary National Conference scheduled for Charlotte




U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs








Date: July 11, 2011
Contact: Christopher Todd
Public Affairs Officer
Phone Number: (305) 490-6030
Email: ctodd@auxpa.org
http://cgaux.org/

News Release




Coast Guard Auxiliary National Conference
scheduled for Charlotte



WASHINGTON – The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will hold its 2011
National Conference (NACON) August 24-28 at the Westin Charlotte
Hotel in Charlotte, N.C. Coast Guard Auxiliary members from
throughout the nation will converge for a series of meetings and
social functions.

“We invite all Coast Guard Auxiliary members to attend NACON,” said
Ernie Davenport, Conference Administrator, for the organization.
“NACON is a great opportunity for Auxiliary members to meet and
interact with senior leaders and members from throughout the
organization.”

NACON is sponsored by the Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc. (CGAuxA),
a non-profit organization based in St. Louis that provides business
management and training support for the Coast Guard Auxiliary.
CGAuxA welcomes corporate sponsors and other interested parties to
participate in NACON.

For additional information on NACON 2011, please visit: cgauxa.org/nacon

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary created by an Act of Congress in 1939
is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard
supporting the Coast Guard in nearly all its missions. For more
information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, please visit cgaux.org

EDITOR’S NOTE: NACON 2011 Logo available in .PDF or .JPG formats




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Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Propeller Strikes May Prove Deadly

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs







July 5, 2011
Contact: Miles Brusherd
417-337-0201
mbrusherd@auxpa.org
http://auxpa.org


News Release

Propeller Strikes May Prove Deadly
WASHINGTON – Each year boat propellers are a leading cause of boating accidents. In many cases, the victims were in the water and near the stern of the vessel.
Passengers moving around a boat or improperly seated may fall overboard when the vessel is moving too fast for prevailing conditions. People can be ejected from a boat for a variety of reasons including, a collision with another boat, hitting a submerged object, rogue waves, and sudden acceleration/deceleration in speed
Contributing factors to propeller strikes accidents are operator inexperience, incompetence, negligence, and operating under the influence of alcohol or other substances. Bow and transom riding are also inherently dangerous.
The Coast Guard Auxiliary suggests turning the engine off and keeping the boat tied to the dock while passengers are boarding or disembarking. The vessel operator should alert passengers prior to speed change or when large waves are imminent. While a boat is underway everyone should be seated and wearing a Coast Guard approved life jacket.
Steps to take for a Man Overboard situation
1. A person seeing someone fall overboard should shout "Man Overboard Port or Starboard side (left or right will do)"
2. Throw a life ring, life jacket or other floatable device to the person.
3. Turn the boat toward the side the person fell overboard.
4. Circle around keeping the individual in sight.
5. Slow down. Turn the engine off at least a boat length away to avoid propeller strike
6. Bring the person aboard and render first aid as needed, checking for additional injuries.
The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.


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