Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Recreational boaters become first responders to auto accident


U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs










Date: May 21, 2012
Contact: Christopher Todd
Public Affairs Officer
 Phone Number: (305)490-6030
Email: ctodd@auxpa.org

News Release



Recreational boaters become first responders to auto accident



OCONOMOWOC, Wis. – Recreational boaters are credited with saving the life of a 25 year-old woman who was seriously injured in a single car accident on Saturday, May 19.  An SUV driven by a 29 year-old man and the woman left Highway 16 and rolled several times down an embankment into the Oconowomoc River. 

Recreational boater Steve Hummer was one of the first people on the scene.  He had just finished launching his boat at a nearby ramp when the crash occurred.  He quickly got underway and headed to the scene, where he saw the bloodied driver exiting the vehicle, and the woman floating face down in the river. 

Just then another boat of fisherman rounded the corner.  One of the men jumped out of the boat and got the woman’s head above water, holding her until rescuers arrived.  Hummer helped shuttle the rescuers to the scene and transport the victims to air ambulance helicopters waiting on the highway.


Okauchee Lake Fire Department Chief Tracy Steele said they are lucky boaters were in the area, according to TODAY’s TMJ4 in Milwaukee.  Steele called the men heroes. 

“Boaters often find themselves in unique situations to render assistance in times of emergency,” said Tom Nunes, Director of Government and Public Affairs for the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary.  “Having the presence of mind to stay calm, operate your vessel safely, provide first aid, and efficiently communicate with rescue personnel, are all paramount when lives are on the line.” 

Boaters interesting in learning more about maritime search and rescue operations, and recreational boating safety, are invited to contact their local Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla or visit cgaux.org for additional information. 

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary created by an Act of Congress in 1939 is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard supporting the Coast Guard in nearly all its missions.  For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, please visit cgaux.org


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Wednesday, May 16, 2012

National Safe Boating Week


U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs







May 17, 2012
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
http/cgaux.org



News Release



National Safe Boating Week



WASHINGTON –  The 2012 National Safe Boating Week campaign kicks off Saturday, May 19 with Coast Guard Auxiliary units promoting recreational boating safety around  nation.  The campaign – which runs through May 25 -- is dedicated to helping boaters understand the need for boating education and Vessel Safety Checks, as well as the importance of wearing life jackets while boating. 



“National Safe Boating Week gives us an opportunity to reflect on the safe operation of boats on the water.  The incidents we study bring home the need for simple safety precautions while underway,” said Coast Guard Auxiliary National Commodore Jim Vass. 



According to National Association of the Boating Law Administrators  report, total fatalities in 2010 dropped to 672, the lowest number on record. The study also found that almost 75 percent of all fatal boating accident victims drowned, and of those, 88 percent were not wearing a life jacket. There were 3,153 injuries and approximately $35.5 million dollars of property damage in 2010 as a result of recreational boating. Operator inattention, improper lookout, operator inexperience, excessive speed, and alcohol use rank as the top five primary contributing factors in accidents.



“We encourage everyone to wear their life jackets and use a ‘kill switch’ while boating, “ Vass said.  “Frequently, we see young children in life jackets, but their parents are not wearing them. All of us need to wear a life jacket to protect ourselves and set a good example for others. I wish the boaters of America a safe boating season.”

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Coast Guard Auxiliary flotillas around the country will be hosting special events to reinforce the safe boating message during NSBW, including free vessel safety checks at local marinas, boating safety classes and other special events.  Check your local newspaper for NSBW events near you.



The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary, supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.



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Monday, May 14, 2012

Coast Guard Auxiliary Association steps up fundraising










May 14, 2012
Contact: Tom Nunes
Tel: 602-617-1979
http://cgauxa.org


News Release 

Coast Guard Auxiliary Association steps up fundraising

ST. LOUIS –The Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc. is stepping up its fund raising efforts. With the addition of staff there is a renewed emphasis on working with corporations, foundations, and other prospective donors. This Auxiliary Association team will be focused on building awareness of the role of the Association within the Auxiliary and the public, corporations and foundations.

Thomas Nunes of Phoenix, Ariz. has been named Vice President for Giving and Outreach. Nunes, a retired Coast Guard officer and a former marketing and sales executive for a Fortune 500 firm will lead the effort. Nunes was the Association Director of Development. Concurrently, he serves as the Coast Guard Auxiliary's Director of Government Public Affairs.



David Friedman of Dayton, Ohio has been appointed Director of Marketing. Friedman was a senior sales and marketing executive in the distribution of television programs and in the sales and marketing of television time to advertisers.   A member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Friedman specializes in training boaters in safe practices on the water.

Charles Eames of Silver Spring, Maryland is the new Director of Development. Eames who operates his own consulting firm will manage day to day fund raising activities for the Association. He is an active member of his local Auxiliary flotilla concentrating on operations.



David Mahler of Bellmore, New York has assumed the role of Director of Corporate Relations.  A former Internet marketing entrepreneur, Mr. Mahler will also manage the Associations social media efforts. He is active in various roles in his local flotilla.



Nick Tarlson of Lakspur, Calif. is the new Director of Communications. Tarlson, owner of a CPA firm, was formerly Director of Public Affairs for the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He is currently Director of Performance Measurement for the Auxiliary.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc., is a Non-Profit, 501(c)(3) organization incorporated in the District of Columbia  providing financial and other support to the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and its volunteers. The Association provides funds for the national Auxiliary programs, facilitates national training, produces educational and outreach materials for the recreational boating safety and other public outreach efforts.  

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Thursday, May 10, 2012

Spring Snowmelt Prompts Water Safety Warning



U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs







Date: May 11, 2012
Contact:Tom Nunes
Public Affairs Officer  

Phone Number: (602) 617-1979
Email: tnunes@auxpa.org
http://cgaux.org





News Release


Spring snowmelt prompts water safety warning 

WASHINGTON Outdoor recreationists on the nation’s mountain fed rivers and lakes should take serious precautions against cold temperatures and swift currents when in or near water this spring.  Despite this year’s below-normal snowfall, the spring snowmelt can still result in swift and cold river flows that can create treacherous conditions for all recreationists – waders, swimmers, paddlers, boaters, anglers, and even hikers cooling off at the water’s edge.  

For example, the utility and state departments in California cautioned that even though the water content of California’s mountain snowpack is near 40 percent of normal, there is still a significant amount of water in the snowpack and it is rapidly melting as mid-spring temperatures continue to warm. As warmer weather and longer days accelerate melting snow in mountainous regions, water temperatures will continue to drop and flows will continue to rise in waterways and reservoirs, with some reservoirs spilling and resulting in higher flows downstream.  

Those planning outings near mountain streams, rivers and reservoirs need to be vigilant and take appropriate safety measures. Water flows will fluctuate with the warming and cooling of the day so boaters always need to be prepared for a change in conditions. Even experienced swimmers can get caught in swift river flows, Check local water conditions before taking a boating trip, wear a life jacket, and avoid alcohol.


Know the Water

·       Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers canbe easily overwhelmed.

·       Cold water entering the ear canal can cause vertigo and disorientation. This may confuse swimmers, causing them to venture deeper into the water.


Know your limits

·       Swimming in open water is more difficult than in a swimming pool – people tire more quickly and can get into trouble.

·       Cold water causes impairment leading to fatalities. It reduces body heat 25 to 30 times faster than air does at the same temperature.

·       Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface. Swift water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.


Wear a life jacket

·       Conditions change quickly in open water and even the best swimmers can misjudge the water and their skills when boating or swimming. Wearing a life jacket can increase survival time.

·       A life jacket can provide some thermal protection against the onset of hypothermia and keep you afloat until someone else can rescue you.


Parental Supervision

  • Actively supervise children in and around open bodies of water, giving them your undivided attention. Appoint a designated “water watcher,” taking turns with other adults.
  • Teach children that swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool: they need to be aware of uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow and changing weather.


Know the Law

·       Generally, every child under age 12 and under must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket when on a moving vessel. A Coast Guard-approved life jacket must be carried for each person on board a boat. This includes rigid or inflatable paddle craft.

·       Every person on board a personal watercraft (popularly known as “jet skis”) and any person being towed behind a vessel must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.

In most states, it is against the law to operate a boat or water ski with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent or more. You can be arrested even when your BAC is less than 0.08 percent if conditions are deemed to be unsafe.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary created by an Act of Congress in 1939 is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard supporting the Coast Guard in nearly all its missions. Coast Guard men and women live and work in the communities they serve and understand the unique needs of those communities. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, please visit cgaux.org

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Monday, May 7, 2012

Coast Guard Auxiliary Association to accept donations of cars and boats










May 7, 2012
Contact: Tom Nunes
Tel: 602-617-1979

Email: tomnunes@coastguardauxiliaryassociation.org
http://cgauxa.org


News Release 

Coast Guard Auxiliary Association to accept donations of cars and boats

ST. LOUIS –The Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc. (CGAUXA), teaming with v-Dac of Port Richmond, Calif., has established a fully managed turnkey program to raise funds.  The v-Dac program allows Auxiliary members and friends to donate automobiles, truck, boats, and aircraft to CGAUXA. 

Donors receive efficient service with funds going to CGAUXA. Advantages include:

  • Ability to donate any vehicle, anywhere in America, running or not.
  • Free, easy, quick, secure alternative to selling or trading-in.
  • Potential tax benefits
  • Use the Internet or phone
  • Free, easy, quick, secure way to help CGAUXA

Benefits to CGAUXA:

  • No liability, costs, staff time, contract or risks
  • Proven high payout
  • 100% of proceeds delivered with no fund raising costs
  • Detailed reports of sales, costs, donor information and marketing resources

You can donate online CGAUXACarDonation or call 877-999-8322 to make your donation. 

v-Dac has been providing Vehicle Donation Services to non profits and donors since 2003. From its origins creating and running the Vehicle Donation Program for the JD Power's affiliated Carclub.com, v-Dac has sought to provide the highest return to charities while providing donors with an easy, trustworthy vehicle donation experience.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary Association, Inc., is a Non-Profit, 501(c)(3) organization incorporated in the District of Columbia  providing financial and other support to the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and its volunteers. The Association provides funds for the national Auxiliary programs, facilitates national training, produces educational and outreach materials for the recreational boating safety and other public outreach efforts.  

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Thursday, May 3, 2012

Boating education may lower your insurance premiums


U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






May 3, 2012
Contact: Bob Donaldson
Public Affairs Officer
501-225-2842
http/cgaux.org



News Release


Boating education may lower your insurance premiums   

WASHINGTON -  The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers two courses that may qualify for insurance company discounts that are designed to enhance skills and knowledge for the recreational boat operator as well as personal watercraft, canoe and kayakers.  Students can enroll in a one day basic class or an advanced knowledge and seamanship course that covers 12 chapters of instruction.  Regardless of the course, a boater education certification card will be issued after successfully completing the test.
While taking a safe boating course, Gregory Deen of Jacksonville, Arkansas, was told that after successful completion of the final test his insurance company might offer a discount.  He checked and sure enough, Mr. Deen did receive a credit advantage on his premium.  He actually received two advantages.  The first with his insurance company and the second; but not least, he became a better and safer boater. 

The Coast Guard Auxiliary has provided safe boating classes since its beginning in 1939.  Their purpose was, and as it are now, to improve safety on coastal and inland waterways for recreational boaters.  All totaled, there are 11 different courses for students from 4 years old all the way through adulthood.   Subjects range from Boating Fun and Waypoints for up to 12 years, About Boating Safety and Boating or Sailing Skills and Seamanship.  The Auxiliary also offers advanced courses in subjects such as Navigating with GPS, How to Read a Nautical Chart and Suddenly in Command for the first mate who might very well find him or herself having to take command in case of an emergency.

The slogan, “Safe Boating is no Accident,” encourages every boat skipper to become involved with the safe boating process by enrolling in one of these classes ,but the process does not stop there.  Safe boating is a family affair and together the learning process can not only provide the entire crew with valuable information, but become a fun and learning experience for all.

To find out more about any of the 11 safe boating courses go to:  http://cgaux.org/boatinged/class_finder/index.php for the nearest Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Education Class.

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service's missions.



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Monday, April 30, 2012

Scholle awarded Coast Guard Meritorious Public Service Award

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs





Date: April 30, 2012
Contact: Tom Nunes
Public Affairs Officer
Phone Number: (602) 617-1979
Email: tnunes@auxpa.org http://cgaux.org


News Release

Scholle awarded Coast Guard Meritorious Public Service Award

ALAMEDA, Calif. – Commodore Marie M. Scholle was awarded the Coast Guard Meritorious Public Service Award by Vice Adm. Manson Brown, Commander, Coast Guard Pacific Area in ceremonies at Coast Guard Base Support Unit Alameda. Scholle serves as Deputy National Commodore for Mission Support for the Coast Guard Auxiliary.

Scholle was recognized for her leadership of over 6,100 Coast Guard Auxiliary members in the Pacific area, and for providing advice to the Pacific Area Commander on Auxiliary matters. She developed a strategic plan with specific goals, milestones, and measures to focus Auxiliary efforts on crucial Pacific Area mission needs. She standardized emergency notification procedures throughout the Pacific that resulted in saving lives and protecting property by alerting mariners and others of a major tsunami threat generated by the March 11, 2011 Japanese earthquake. Scholle also oversaw formation of new Coast Guard Auxiliary units in American Samoa, Guam, Saipan, and Barrow, Alaska.

The Coast Guard maintains several public service awards to recognize private citizens, groups, or organizations that help the Coast Guard carry out its missions. The Coast Guard Meritorious Public Service Award, the second highest, is presented to recognize unusual courage in advancing a Coast Guard mission, substantial contribution to the Coast Guard that has produced tangible results, or specific individual accomplishments that provide unique benefits to the public.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary created by an Act of Congress in 1939 is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard supporting the Coast Guard in nearly all its missions. Coast Guard Auxiliary men and women live and work in the communities they serve and understand the unique needs of their communities. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary, please visit cgaux.org

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Ed. Note: Photo Available.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Lynda Nutt, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers presented Coast Guard Auxiliary's National RBS Partnership Award


U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






April 17, 2012
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org
http/cgaux.org

News Release

Lynda Nutt, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers presented
Coast Guard Auxiliary’s National RBS Partnership Award

WASHINGTON -- Lynda Nutt, program manager for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers National Operations Center for Water Safety, has been awarded the Coast Guard Auxiliary’s National Recreational Boating Safety Partnership Award by Coast Guard Auxiliary National Commodore Jim Vass.

The award citation thanks Ms. Nutt and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for their outstanding sustained support and promotion of the Auxiliary's Recreational Boating Safety program for the period Sept. 3, 2005, to Aug. 31, 2011.

As a result of mandating use of life jackets by boaters on the lakes the Corps administers, it has demonstrated that requiring life jackets does not affect the number of boaters or the number of people interested in boat ownership. In addition, the Corps' decision to require life jackets validated the assertions of the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary that mandatory life jacket wear is essential for safe recreational boating.

“The Auxiliary is greatly indebted to Lynda's steadfast dedication to water safety. Her tireless work with the Corps of Engineers through the years has strengthened our partnership with the Corps, and we look forward to nurturing and maintaining this valued partnership,” said Bruce Johnson, the Auxiliary’s director for recreational boating safety outreach.

Ms. Nutt retired from the U.S. Army March 31 following nearly 30 years of service.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, created by an Act of Congress in 1939, is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard across all mission areas. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary and a flotilla near you, visit cgaux.org.

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Thursday, March 15, 2012


U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






March 15, 2012
Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
bswank@auxpa.org
http://cgaux.org

News Release

Use the ‘down time’ to refresh your boating skills

WASHINGTON – Are you patiently waiting for the ice to thaw or the weather to warm up so you can finally get your boat back on the water again? Then why not use the down time productively and take a boating safety class conducted by your local Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla?

The Coast Guard Auxiliary offers numerous boating courses for the public, but you may want to go with the basic “About Boating Safely” course or the more in-depth “Boating Skills & Seamanship” course as a refresher prior to the start of your boating season.

“About Boating Safely” is an eight-hour beginner boating class designed to give you the knowledge needed to obtain a boat license or safety certification in many states. Many boat insurance companies will offer discounts on boating insurance to boaters who successfully complete “About Boating Safely”.

“Boating Skills & Seamanship” is a more comprehensive, multiple session program designed for both the experienced and the novice boater. The course consists of eight core-required two-hour lessons plus five elective lessons, providing up-to-date knowledge for safely handling boats in all conditions.

To find a Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla in your area offering boating safety courses, go to CGAUX.ORG, click on “Units”, “Flotilla Finder”, then enter your zip code…a listing of flotillas within your vicinity will be displayed.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, created by an Act of Congress in 1939, is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard across all mission areas.

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Tuesday, February 21, 2012



U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs





Feb. 21, 2012
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
bswank@auxpa.org
http/cgaux.org


News Release

When it really counts, it’s good to be an USCG Auxiliary member

WASHINGTON –.If you’ve ever had a problem on the water, you know how much a friend’s assistance can be.

Put your self on your boat…your fuel gauge fails and you run out of fuel on the open water…what do you do?

Sure, you can call on a commercial towing service, and spend hundreds of dollars trying to get back to your home dock. Or, just maybe a member of your local flotilla has a five-gallon can of gas and can come to your rescue.

That’s just one of the many benefits that you can enjoy as a member of a U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla. Comradery. Not to mention doing something meaningful that might help protect the environment or…yes…result in actually saving another person’s life.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers any citizen 17 years or older an opportunity to give back something to their community while enjoying the benefits of being a member of the only Congressionally-authorized auxiliary of a military unit in the U.S.

If your talent is teaching, the Auxiliary offers countless courses on boating safety that are made available to the public for little cost…and your teaching skills just might save a boater’s life.

Or maybe you own a boat and want to offer it for use on missions such as search and rescue or routine patrols that help the Coast Guard by taking on a share of duties that the Coast Guard would otherwise have to undertake.

Regardless of what you do in “real life”, there’s a place for you in the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Just call a flotilla in your area and learn first hand what you can do for your fellow man…and how you can benefit yourself.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, created by an Act of Congress in 1939, is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard across all mission areas. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary and a flotilla near you, visit cgaux.org.



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Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Cold weather boating requires extra caution, preparation

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Public Affairs






January 17, 2012
Contact: Bill Swank
Public Affairs Officer
305-588-7173
bswank@auxpa.org
http/cgaux.org




News Release



Cold weather boating requires extra caution, preparation


WASHINGTON – While the majority of boaters in colder parts of the country have winterized their boats or put them into storage until spring, many still rely on their vessels for hunting, fishing or necessary transportation in cold weather, substantially increasing their risk of a deadly accident. Extra caution and preparation should be taken before heading out on the water in winter.

The U.S Coast Guard Auxiliary says the importance of wearing a life jacket becomes even more critical when the danger for hypothermia is added to other concerns. Sudden immersion in cold water can have severe physiological consequences, such as cardiac arrest, fast loss of body heat (the body loses heat 25 times faster in cold water than in cold air) and involuntary inhalation of water (gasping) that results in drowning. Most Coast Guard-approved life jackets when worn are designed to keep the user’s head above water while awaiting rescue.

In addition to wearing a life jacket, wearing the right clothing also can contribute to a more enjoyable and safer cold weather boating experience. Consider layering clothing, including a wet suit or dry suit, to help ward off the effects of hypothermia.

Following are some additional tips for safe winter boating:

--Assess the risks – envision what can go wrong and be fully equipped and prepared.

--Leave a float plan with a responsible individual who knows your intentions, location, and who to call if you fail to return as scheduled.

--Carry a VHF radio or EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon), signal flares and other means to draw attention to your location.

--Be aware of and prepared for the shock of sudden immersion and incapacitating effects of cold water – dress to get wet and carry a change of clothing in a waterproof container.

--Maintain situational awareness on the water – be aware of activity around your vessel and potential for fast-changing weather conditions.

--Boat safe and sober – save the alcohol for when you’ve safely returned.

--Be sure your vessel is in good operating condition and has the necessary safety equipment on board before you leave the dock.

--Refresh your seamanship skills…take a boating safety course offered by your local Coast Guard Auxiliary flotilla.

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, created by an Act of Congress in 1939, is the uniformed civilian component of the U.S. Coast Guard and supports the Coast Guard across all mission areas. For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary and a flotilla near you, visit cgaux.org



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